Ahmed’s Dev-Shop

Simple charisma test: what makes you a leader

Posted in Management, team building, workplace by Ahmed Siddiqui on February 14, 2010

If  you have assigned a leadership role where you are responsible for the performance of couple of people, this simple checklist may help you.

If the following checklist returns positive results, it seems you are going to enjoy your leadership role otherwise you may gonna lose your respect.

Checklist

1.   You consider yourself responsible for the performance of your team members
2.   You are eager to know what they think about you
3.   You are eager to know and ask frequently if they are comfortable with the task or role
4.   You are eager to listen their suggestions and opinions
5.   You are able to avoid favoritism based on personal likeness
6.   You support instead of compete with your team members
7.   You insure that they have enough knowledge of the task before expecting any outcome
8.   You are well aware of the strengths and weaknesses of every single member
9.   You are well aware of the need hierarchy of every single member
10. You are not scared of their capabilities and/or performance
11.  You don’t want them to consider you as always-right
12.  You are eager to learn from your team members
13.  You always appreciate their efforts regardless if failure occurs
14.  You share the credit with the team
15.  You are able to see if any team member exploiting others or spoiling the team environments
16.  You take your team’s opinion before taking any decision
17.  You show your trust on them, avoiding unnecessary questions & letting them taking initiatives
18.  You keep your eye upon them but avoid annoying micro-management

strengths

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Why Patterns Suck?

Posted in Engineering, mindset, programming, software, Thoughts, workplace by Ahmed Siddiqui on April 10, 2008

Surprised when I heard some people saying “Patterns suck”, I was eager to know why they hate these precious guidelines which often save us from reinventing the wheel, letting us using it.

Fortunately after just few days I had to work with some confident developers, known as pattern-lovers. Having plenty of technical knowledge, they were used to count the names of patterns–and there authors–on finger tips. People, you can speak technobabble with, for not just hours but for days. I admired them and found myself among blessed people.

Later I found something strange, besides all their knowledge they had very few success stories and their management was not satisfied with their problem solving skills.

I had started observing the causes of their failure. Mean while I had to design an architecture for a coming enterprise business application. I started scaffolding by enhancing and optimizing my legacy libraries and framework with my team. I asked the experts to review my approach to let my approach become foolproof.

Geeks love technical discussions so I got a prompt response and they started highlighting the weaknesses, I was very glad as I got a chance to improve. But unexpectedly most of the issues identified were as follows:

Geeks: Aren’t you using NHibernate (a port for Hibernate for .Net)?

Me: Nope, I personally admire NHibernate for its OO approach and database independence but I think that this application does not have complex business processing, instead it mostly comprise of chatting between the user and database. It also comprises of complex reports which is not a specialty of NHibernate. While our tailored framework provides Report Factory and configuration as well as tiered approach for reporting. Another reason is that our expertise on NHibernate do not allow us to use it in a time-critical project at this stage.

Geek: What? Do you know where NHibernate came from, it’s a port of Hibernate, being used in the most powerful language “Java”. It has nothing to compete with MS’ ADO objects.

Me: Yes, I do agree that Java and it’s platforms are lot more maturer but since every language or technology has some of its own strengths and weaknesses, our framework and libraries are optimized with the strengths of .Net. Our wrapper classes exploiting some new features provide in the latest version of .Net.

Geek: Hey don’t use ADO.Net objects, they do nothing but violates layering These objects are mess. You should use pure objects that’s why I recommended you to use NHibernate.

Me: I think it depends that how are you using them, in our scenario they are completely database independent because they are boxed in generic objects and are created by abstract factories so we can enjoy Inversion of Control, Polymorphisms, and Database Independence.

Geeks: These libraries are not open source, you don’t know what they have written in it.

Me: I admire the benefits of open source but these object are rich, free, built-in, tested and performing well in enterprise applications. I do not very often use them but I found them very useful in such kind of applications.

Geeks: You incorrectly applied this pattern; let me show you the documentation.

Me: This pattern like other patterns have different applications, I am following this approach because it fits well in this scenario. This flexibility is also allowed by experts.

Geek: No, patterns should be followed as is. They are not to be compromised for performance or whatever. And remember enterprise applications, built on great technologies like EJB, looks graceful even if they are not enough performant.

Geek: Increase your number of layers like we have did in that application. You have not decoupled enough.

Me: Yes previously I did have the same number of layers but I found it as an overkill in this project, so I modified this version for medium-sized performance-hungry applications.

Geek: And why did you coupled these two major tiers, this is an unacceptable violation of N-Tier Architecture

Me: No, these are still two different layers, but I am keeping them in a single project during development as most of the developers are working on both layers. They still can be deployed on different servers.

Geek: I’m still not satisfied, a lot patterns have not been used, recommended by the gurus and we follow them because we know they are the best.

Me: They might have recommended it for some different type of project and this approach may be suitable in that particular scenario.

Geek: We found their practices the best in all type and size of projects, whatever, it’s not that simple you think it is, you have to add a lot more complexity.

Me: May be you are right as I found you very knowledgeable but I learned and believe that a complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that works.

… that’s how I got to know somehow why people hate patterns”